UNITA' DI APPRENDIMENTO: SCUOLA SECONDARIA 2°

INGLESE UNITA’ DIDATTICA SCUOLA SECONDARIA 2 di Monica Manzolillo

The Mad Woman in the Attic: Bertha Mason from Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847) to Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea (1966).

This thematic teaching unit is meant to be part of an interdisciplinary module on female characters in modern and contemporary English and Italian literature. The students are supposed to have already studied Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre so that they are ready to concentrate on a single minor character in the novel. They analyze an extract in which Bertha Mason is described in Jane Eyre and subsequently read the same episode narrated from Bertha’s point of view in Wide Sargasso Sea. After stressing similarities and differences between the two excerpts and the way Bertha is portrayed in each of them, they contextualize the second passage researching on the web more about Jean Rhys’ novel, her other works, post-modern fiction and feminist criticism. Finally, a series of possible interdisciplinary links to be developed with teachers of other subjects of by themselves are also considered with students.

The following pages provide general and detailed lesson plans for the teaching unit and all the material to be distributed to students.

 

Addresses

Students of the last year of Liceo Linguistico or Liceo Scientifico.

Aims

·                    Cognitive: To reach a wider and deeper understanding of female characters in literature and women condition thorough history and different cultures, to discover the universality of the themes and topic studied.

·                    Meta-cognitive: To analyze and compare various female characters in the light of different cultural and historical conditions, to form a personal opinion on the subject matter, to analyze and appreciate a literary text identifying its stylistic and linguistic peculiarities and finally contextualising it.

·                    Socio-affective: Let students cooperate among themselves and finally form a critical perspective on the topic.

Objectives

·                    Cognitive: To focus on a minor character in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, to analyze how the same character is portrayed in Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea in order to draw attention on the relativity of points of view, to speculate on the theme of madness as a relative concept, to contextualize Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea  and introduce some aspects of post-modern fiction and feminist criticism, to link the topics analyzed with the other subjects studied by students.

·                    Meta-cognitive:  To work on the texts in a more and more autonomous way, to express personal opinions on the content of the excerpts analyzed and related issues, to exploit all of the four skills (listening/ speaking/reading /writing).

·                    Socio-affective: Work in pairs/groups to develop personality and exchange points of view.

Pre-requisites

·                    Cognitive: Basic knowledge of the conventions of novels and how to analyze literary texts, a good knowledge of Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre plot, features and themes together with background information related to the writer and the Victorian age.

·                    Meta-cognitive: To be able to express personal opinions and to use a personal computer.

·                    Socio-affective: A positive attitude for collaborating with other students, interest in  discovering new issues  related with what previously studied.

Methodology

The teacher uses a communicative approach because the final goal is to enable students to talk in English as much as possible. Literature is thought through an inductive method based on the pedagogical principle that learning by discovery lasts longer. Students start reading the extracts from the two novels and after a series of activities stimulating their personal response, come to a generalisation. The teaching is absolutely student centred and aims at letting them become more and more autonomous through pair and group works but also through individual and class activities.  The teacher’s role is that of a guide, an instructor, a facilitator of learning.

Time

Two 2 hours lessons and two 1 hour lessons in the mid first term of the school year.

Place

Classroom, computer laboratory.

Teaching aids

Blackboard, CD player, handouts, textbook, personal computers, photocopies.

Evaluation

Continuous feedback, final test, teaching assessment questionnaire. Evaluation will also take into account the students’ response to the topic and their level of interest and commitment. Some reinforcement activities will also be proposed to the students.  

Interdisciplinary

Links

·                    Religion: Marriage.

·                    Italian: Verga, Storia di una capinera; Sibilla Aleramo Una Donna; Iginio Ugo Tarchetti, Fosca; Antonio Fogazzaro, Malombra.

·                    Latin: Seneca, Medea.

·                    Visual arts: Artemisia Gentileschi.

·                    History: The Suffragettes and women struggle for vote.

·                    Philosophy: F. Nietzsche and A. Lou Salomé .

·                    Psychology: Madness as a relative concept.

Strategies

·                    Teaching strategies:

The lesson: planning the lesson, promoting interaction, using the board, eliciting, showing visuals, checking, controlled practice, correction, setting up communication activities.

The classroom: setting up seating arrangements, giving instructions, setting up pair/group work, monitoring, using students’ names, starting and finishing the lesson.

The teacher: establishing eye contact, using gestures and facial expressions, positioning and movement, attention spread, using the voice, controlled teacher talking time.

·                    Learning strategies

Cognitive: Relating new information to prior knowledge,  elaborating,  transferring and translating, using inference and deduction, using and creating resources, directed attention, selected attention, contextualisation.

Meta-cognitive: Self management, self monitoring and evaluating, using the media, finding out about learning.

Socio-affective: Consciousness raising, cooperating, using conventional strategies, using stress and intonation, using mime and gestures, adjusting the message. 

 

Lesson plans:

·                    Lesson 1 (2 hours)

Text 1

Presentation:  warm-up (spider diagram)

Practice: 1) Listening

                    Extensive listening

                    Intensive listening (True/False answers)

                2) Reading

                    Extensive reading (skimming and     

                    scanning)

                    Intensive reading (text analysis)

Homework : Short composition (creative writing)

·                    Lesson 2 (2 hours)

Correction of homework.

Text 2

Practice: 1) Listening

                    Extensive listening

                    Intensive listening (Yes/No answers)

                2) Reading

                    Extensive reading (skimming and

                    scanning)

                    Intensive reading (text analysis)

Homework : Internet research on the context.

 

·                    Lesson 3 (1 hour)

Class discussion on the research results: from text to novel, to the other novels by the same author, author, post-modernism, feminist criticism and historical context.

Hints for interdisciplinary connections.

 

·                    Lesson 4 (1 hour)

Testing

Tests + teaching assessment questionnaire.

 

Follow up: Reinforcement and recovery activities

                    (cooperative learning)

 

DETAILED LESSON PLANS:

Lesson 1 (two hours)

· Phase: Presentation.
· Step: Warm-up.
· Time:10/15 minutes.
· Activity: The teacher tells the class that they are going to concentrate on a minor character in the previously studied novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. He/she writes the character’s name on the blackboard inviting the class to tell all they know about her and the way she is presented in the novel also encouraging the students to express personal feelings and opinions. The teacher creates a spider diagram on the blackboard with their answers.
· Subaim: To elicit the students’ prior knowledge, to introduce the topic of the lessons, to arouse interest and motivation.
· Grouping: Teacher/students.
· Teacher activity and role: Asks questions, writes the spider diagram on the blackboard. The teacher acts as a guide.
· Students activity: Answer question telling what they think and remember.
· Teaching strategies: Using the board, eliciting.
· Learning strategies: Relating on prior knowledge, consciousness raising.
· Teaching aids: Blackboard, chalks.

 

 

· Phase: Practice.
· Step: Extensive and intensive Listening.
· Time: 20 minutes.
· Activity: The students listen to a recorded version of the extract by native speakers. First, they listen once or twice without pauses to catch the overall meaning of the passage (extensive listening) and the teacher asks some very general questions to check the level of understanding. Then a series of questions with true/false answers are read and given to the students who are asked to listen again in order to answer them (intensive listening). The teacher makes some pauses to facilitate answering. 
· Subaim: Students listen to native speakers in order to catch the right rhythm, stress and intonation. Moreover, they start going into the text.
· Grouping: Teacher/students.
· Teacher activity and role: Plays the tape, asks questions to check comprehension, distributes handouts with true/false questions. The teacher acts as an organizer/instructor.
· Students activity: Listen to the tape, answer the questions.
· Teaching strategies: Controlled practice.
· Learning strategies: Directed attention, selective attention.
· Teaching aids: CD player, text 1 , handout 1.

 

· Phase: Practice.
· Step: Extensive reading.
· Time: 20 minutes.
· Activity: The students read the passage silently and individually, first skimming to catch the general meaning and then scanning to look for particular items or details in order to answer the Wh-questions given to them in an handout. A guided class correction follows. 
· Subaim: To prepare students for the intensive reading stage and for a detailed understanding of the text.
· Grouping: Single students, class.
· Teacher activity and role: Gives clear instructions, distributes handouts, guides the discussion. The teacher acts as an organizer/instructor then as a checker.
· Students activity: Read the text first skimming and then scanning, answer the questions given to them.
· Teaching strategies: Giving instructions, correction.
· Learning strategies: Directed attention, selective attention.
· Teaching aids: Text 1, handout 1.

· Phase: Practice.
· Step: Intensive Reading.
· Time: 20 minutes.
· Activity: The students pay attention to details in the text in order to reach a deeper level of understanding. They work in pairs to some specific exercises and then a spokesman for each pair reports the results to the rest of the class so that a guided correction can follow.
· Subaim: To enable students to fully understand and appreciate the text.
· Grouping: Students work in pairs. For the correction they work as a class.
· Teacher activity and role: Gives clear instructions, distributes handouts, guides the discussion. The teacher acts as an organizer and a consultant.
· Students activity: Work in groups in order to do the exercises, then check answers with the other groups.
· Teaching strategies: Setting up pair work, setting up communication activities.
· Learning strategies: Cooperating.
· Teaching aids: Text 1, handout 1.

· Phase: Production.
· Step: Homework assignment (creative writing).
· Time: 10 minutes.
· Activity: The teacher asks the students to write a short composition (10-15 lines) at home in which they rewrite the attic episode from Bertha’s point of view trying to imagine her feelings and reactions.
· Subaim: This activity serves to re-elaborate in a critical perspective what they have learnt. Besides, it prepares the approaching of Jean Rhys’ rewriting of the novel Jane Eyre from Bertha’s point of view. 
· Grouping: Teacher/Students.
· Teacher activity and role: Gives clear instructions and answer the students’ questions. The teacher acts as an instructor.
· Students activity: Listen to the teacher’s instructions and ask questions.
· Teaching strategies: Giving instructions.
· Learning strategies: Question for clarification.
· Teaching aids: Handout 1.

 

Lesson 2 (two hours)
· Phase: Practice and presentation
· Step: Homework correction.
· Time: 15/20 minutes.
· Activity: The students read their compositions to the class and are asked questions by the teacher and/or classmates regarding the peculiar elements emphasized in their creative writing. A short brainstorming activity on what they expect to find in Wide Sargasso Sea follows.
· Subaim: This activity is meant to exploit the students’ creative skills. Moreover, it serves to motivate them to read Jean Rhys’ extract and arouse their interest.
· Grouping: Class.
· Teacher activity and role: Asks to read aloud, asks questions. The teacher acts as a guide.
· Students activity: Read their compositions, listen to what the other classmates have written.
· Teaching strategies: Correcting, engaging.
· Learning strategies: Elaborating in a personal way.
· Teaching aids: Blackboard (if necessary to focus on certain points).

· Phase: Practice.
· Step: Extensive and intensive Listening.
· Time: 20 minutes.
· Activity: The students listen to a recorded version of the extract by native speakers. First, they listen once or twice without pauses to catch the overall meaning of the passage (extensive listening) and the teacher asks some very general questions to check the level of understanding. Then a series of questions with yes/no answers are read and given to the students in an handout and they are asked to listen again in order to answer them (intensive listening). The teacher makes some pauses to facilitate answering. 
· Subaim: To give a first approach to the text and a first understanding of it. Moreover, students listen to native speakers in order to catch the right rhythm, stress and intonation.
· Grouping: Teacher/students.
· Teacher activity and role: Plays the tape, asks questions to check comprehension, distributes a questionnaire with yes/no answers questions. The teacher acts as an organizer/instructor.
· Students activity: Listen to the tape, answer the questions.
· Teaching strategies: Controlled practice.
· Learning strategies: Directed attention, selective attention.
· Teaching aids: CD player, text 2, handout 2.

· Phase: Practice.
· Step: Extensive reading.
· Time: 20 minutes.
· Activity: The students read the passage silently and individually, first skimming to catch the general meaning and then scanning to look for particular items or details in order to answer the Wh-questions given to them in an handout. A guided class correction follows. 
· Subaim: To prepare students for the intensive reading stage and for a deeper understanding of the text.
· Grouping: Single students, class.
· Teacher activity and role: Gives clear instructions, distributes handouts, guides the discussion. The teacher acts as an organizer/instructor then as a checker.
· Students activity: Read the text first skimming and then scanning, answer the questions given to them.
· Teaching strategies: Giving instructions, correction.
· Learning strategies: Directed attention, selective attention.
· Teaching aids: Text 2, handout 2.

· Phase: Practice.
· Step: Intensive Reading.
· Time: 30 minutes.
· Activity: The students pay attention to details in the text and compare it with the extract already studied taken from Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre stressing similarities and differences. They work in pairs to some specific exercises and then a spokesman for each pair reports the results to the rest of the class so that a guided correction can follow.
· Subaim: This activity serves to reach a deeper level of understanding and make a final synthesis and comparison between the two excerpts.
· Grouping: Students work in pairs. For the correction they work as a class.
· Teacher activity and role: Gives clear instructions, distributes handouts, guides the discussion. The teacher acts as an organizer and as a consultant.
· Students activity: Work in groups in order to do the exercises, then check answers with the other groups.
· Teaching strategies: Setting up pair work, setting up communication activities.
· Learning strategies: Cooperating.
· Teaching aids: Text 2, handout 2.

· Phase: Production.
· Step: Home work assignment.
· Time: 10 minutes.
· Activity: The teacher asks the students to research individually or in groups on the internet material to fit the passage they have read into context and gain more information about the novel it is taken from, its author, the cultural context of the 60’, post-modern novel and feminist criticism. Students not having a personal computer at home can use the computer laboratory at school.
· Subaim: Contextualize the text through autonomous research.
· Grouping: Teacher /students.
· Teacher activity and role: Gives clear instructions and answer the students’ questions. The teacher acts as an instructor.
· Students activity: Listen to the teacher’s instructions and ask questions.
· Teaching strategies: Giving instructions.
· Learning strategies: Questions for clarification.
· Teaching aids: Handout 2.

Lesson 3 (one hour)

· Phase: Contextualisation.
· Step: Discussion.
· Time: 50 minutes.
· Activity: The students report the results of their research to the class and exchange material. A debate follows so that, through everybody’s contribution, a final synthesis can be done. Hints for possible interdisciplinary connections are also explored.
· Subaim: This activity is meant to let students fit the passage into context through autonomous research and class discussion.
· Grouping: Class.
· Teacher activity and role: Asks to report research results, asks questions, guides the discussion. The teacher acts as a guide.
· Students activity: Discuss about research results, exchange material.
· Teaching strategies: Guided practice.
· Learning strategies: Exchanging points of view.
· Teaching aids: Blackboard (if necessary to focus on certain points).

Lesson 4 (one hour)

· Phase: Assessment.
· Step: Testing.
· Time: 50 minutes.
· Activity: The teacher gives students a test for final evaluation. An anonymous teaching assessment questionnaire is also given to them so that not only students but also the teacher is tested.
· Subaim: To check the effectiveness of teaching not only through what students have learnt but also through what they think about the topics studied and the entire teaching/learning process.
· Grouping: Class.
· Teacher activity and role: Distributes tests + questionnaires, answers questions. The teacher acts as an instructor and a checker.
· Students activity: Work on the test + questionnaire.
· Teaching strategies: Giving instructions.
· Learning strategies: Elaborating.
· Teaching aids: Photocopies.

Follow up: reinforcement and recovery activities

· Phase: Follow up.
· Step: Reinforcement and recovery.
· Time: One or two 50 minutes lessons.
· Activity: Students who need sustain or recovery are assigned to a tutor and are given a personalized programme by the teacher. Tutors will be chosen among those who passed the final test with best results and will help the other students in order to reinforce their own knowledge and abilities. The teacher will monitor the activities carried out in class.
· Subaim: Let poor students recuperate and let good students reinforce their own knowledge and abilities.
· Grouping: Group work. Groups should be rather small (3/4 people).
· Teacher activity and role: The teacher individuates the tutors and assigns students to them. Then she gives each student a personal programme and all the necessary instructions. The teacher acts as an organizer, an instructor and a guide.
· Students activity: Tutors help weak students recuperate and reinforce knowledge.
· Teaching strategies: Setting up group work, setting up seating arrangements, monitoring.
· Learning strategies: Cooperating, inferring, elaborating.
· Teaching aids: Photocopies, handouts, textbook.

APPENDIX

All the material to be distributed to students is here enclosed (the texts to be analyzed and handouts with activities), including suggestions for the warm up phase, final test plus evaluation grid and a teaching assessment questionnaire.

WARM UP

· Who is Bertha Mason?
· Where does she live?
· What does she do?
· How can you describe her?
· What do you think about her?

Rochester’s first wife  

 

                    

 

BERTHA MASON

 

                                                                                                                She sets fire to the house

 

 

   She burns Jane’s

    wedding dress                                            

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                       

                                 Mad                    She lives locked up in                             Savage  

                                                             Thornfield Hall attic     

 

 

Text 1

From Charlotte Brontë , Jane Eyre, London, Penguin, 1999, pp. 51-52.

In a room without a window, there burnt a fire guarded[1] by  a high and strong fender[2], and a lamp suspended from the ceiling by a chain. Grace Pool bent over the fire, apparently cooking something in a saucepan. In the deep shade, at the further end of the room, a figure ran backwards and forwards. What it was, whether beast or human being, one could not, at fist sight tell; it grovelled[3], seemingly, on all fours; it snatched[4] and growled[5] like some strange wild animal: but it was covered with clothing, and a quantity of dark, grizzled[6] hair, wild as a mane[7], hid its head and face.

“Good-morrow[8], Mrs Poole!” said Mr Rochester. “How are you? And how is your charge[9] today?”

“We’re tolerable, sir, I thank you,” replied Jane, lifting the boiling mess[10] carefully on to the hob[11]: “rather snappish[12] but not  ‘rageous.”[13]

A fierce cry seemed to give the lie to her favourable report: the clothed hyena rose up, and stood tall on its hind feet[14]. She was a big woman, in stature almost equalling her husband, and corpulent besides: she showed virile force in the contest – more than once she almost trotted[15] him, athletic as she was.

“That is my wife,” said he. “Such is the sole conjugal embrace I am ever to know – such are the endearments[16] which are to solace my leisure hours! And this is what I wished to have (laying his hand on my shoulder): this young girl, who stands so grave and quiet at the mouth of hell, looking collectedly at the gambols[17] of a demon. I wanted her just as a change after that fierce ragout[18]. Wood[19] and Briggs[20], look at the difference! Compare these clear eyes with the red balls yonder[21] – this face with that mask – this form with that bulk[22]: then judge me, priest of the Gospel and man of the law, and remember with what judgement ye[23] judge shall be judged!”

Handout 1

Listening.

Read the sentences and listen again in order to decide if they are true or false.

 

True

False

Bertha Mason  is in a dark room.

 

 

She is guarded by Mr Rochester.

Reading.

Read the questions and then read again the passage in order to answer them.

1) Who lives up in the attic?

2) Why is she there?

3) Is there somebody else with her?

4) Is there something strange about Bertha? What can we guess about her?

5) What does she do to her husband?

6) Who does Mr Rochester compare her to?

 

Text analysis.

Work with a partner and answer the following questions.

1)  Focus on the first paragraph and describe the room where the action takes place. What does it tell us about the people who live there?

Considering Jane’s description of Bertha and her actions, what do you think her attitude to Bertha is?

2) In the last paragraph, Rochester compares his wife Bertha to Jane. Report in the following chart the main differences between them?   

 

 

She has dark hair.

 

 

Grace Pool is cooking something.      

 

 

Jane talks to Bertha.

 

 

 

Bertha

 

Jane

 

3)                 Underline all the words used to describe Bertha and complete the following chart. What kind of feeling and attitude do they convey?

Pronouns

 

Adjectives

 

Nouns

 

Verbs

 

Adverbs

 

 

Homework: Composition, creative writing (10-15 lines).

·                    Rewrite the attic episode from Bertha’s point of view trying to imagine her feelings and reactions.

 

Text 2

Rhys Jean, Wide Sargasso Sea, London, Penguin, 2003, pp.268-269.

When night comes, and she[24] has had several drinks and sleeps, it is easy to take the keys. I know now where she keeps them. Then I open the door and walk into their world. It is, as I always knew, made of cardboard. I have seen it before somewhere, this cardboard world where everything is coloured brown or dark or red or yellow that has no light in it. As I walked along the passages I wish I could see what is behind the cardboard. They tell me I am in England but I don’t believe them. We lost our way to England. When? Where? I don’t remember, but we lost it. Was it that evening in the cabin when he[25] found me talking to the young man who brought me food? I put my arms around his neck and asked him to help me. He said, “I didn’t know what to do, sir.” I smashed[26] the glass and plates against the porthole[27]. I hoped it would break and the sea come in. A woman came and then an older man who cleared up the broken things on the floor. He did not look at me while he was doing it. The third man said, “Drink this and you will sleep”. I drank it and I said, “It isn’t like it seems to be,” – “I know. It never is,” he said. And then I slept. When I woke it was a different sea. Colder. It was that night, I think, that we changed course and lost our way to England. This cardboard house where I walk at night is not England.

 

Handout 2

Listening.

Read the sentences and listen again in order to decide if they are true or false.

 

Yes

No

Is Antoinette in a dark room?

 

 

Is Grace Pool  sleeping?

 

 

Is Mrs Rochester there?

 

 

Is Antoinette in England?

 

 

Does she walk down the house at night?

 

 

 

Reading.

Read the questions and then read again the passage in order to answer them.

1) What does Antoinette can do at night?
2) How does she describe Thornfield Hall?
3) Why is she convinced she is not in England?

Text analysis.

Work with a partner and answer the following questions.

1) Who is the voice speaking in the extract? What type of narrator does the writer use?
2) Why do you think she refers to the house as “their world”?
3) What does Antoinette means when she says that their word is “made of cardboard”?
4) What effect does the use of repetition have in the passage?
5) Reread the passage from Jane Eyre and stress similarities and differences about Bertha/Antoinette.
6) Do you think your attitude towards the character has changed after reading her own voice?
7) Do you think madness is an objective state or do you think it is determined by the historical and cultural context in which one lives?

Homework

From text to context: research on the internet, individually or in groups, to find out more about Wide Sargasso Sea, the other novels by Jean Rhys, post-modernism, feminist criticism and the historical context of the 60’.

 

FINAL TEST

 

Name………... Surname………………………… Class……….. Date…………

 

THE MAD WOMAN IN THE ATTIC

Representations of Bertha Mason in Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea

1) In what way Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys is in connection with Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2) What role does Bertha Mason play in Jane Eyre? And in Wide Sargasso Sea? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3) Why do you think Jean Rhys chose a “mad woman” to talk about? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4) The two narrators in Wide Sargasso Sea are:
A) Jane Eyre and Mr Rochester.
B) Antoinette and Mr Rochester.
C) Antoinette and Jane Eyre.

5) Among the most common devices used by post-modernist novelists we can list:

A) the alternation of points of view.

B) the stream of consciousness technique.

C) Realism.

6) The difficulty for women to speak in a male dominated society is also expressed in another novel by Jean Rhys whose title is:

A) Voyage in the light.

B) Voyage in the colours.

C) Voyage in the dark.

 

EVALUATION GRID

Questions 1, 2 and 3

For each answer given maximum 3 points:

           Pertinence

         (max 1 point)

Grammar accuracy

(max 1 point)

Content

(max 1 point)

·                    fail 0, 10

·                    borderline 0,25

·                    not bad0,50

·                    good 0,75

·                    very good 1

·                    fail 0, 10

·                    borderline  0,25

·                    not bad0,50

·                    good 0,75

·                    very good 1

·                    fail 0, 10

·                    borderline 0,25

·                    not bad0,50

·                    good 0,75

·                    very good 1

 

Questions 4, 5 and 6

For each answer:

·                    1 point if the answer is correct

·                    0 points if the answer is wrong, omitted or not valid. (Double answers are to be considered as not valid).

The points obtained are transformed into decimals through the following equation:

points obtained x 10 : 12

Fractions will eventually be rounded off to the higher mark is more than 0,50 and to the lower mark if inferior than 0,50.

TEACHING ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE

Tick where you think appropriate and write in the blank spaces. Please, do not put you name on the paper.

1) How did you find the content of the lessons?
· Boring.
· Quite stimulating.
· Very interesting.
2) What kind of grouping did you like most?
· Group/pair work.
· Teacher/student.
· Individual study.
3)Did you find explanations/instructions clear?
· Yes, always clear.
· Not always clear.
· Absolutely not.
4)How did you find the rhythm of speech?
· Too fast.
· A bit fast but comprehensible.
· Ordinary.
· A bit slow but comprehensible.
· Rather slow.

5)How did you find the tone of the voice?
· Too high.
· A bit high but comprehensible. 
· Ordinary.
· A bit low but comprehensible.
· Rather low.

6)How would you define the general attitude of the teacher?
· Detached.
· Professional.
· Open and friendly.
· Other……………….

BIBLIOGRAPHY

· Brontë Charlotte, Jane Eyre, London, Penguin, 1999.
· Brumfit J. C., Language and Literature Teaching: from Practice to Principle, Oxford, Pergamon, 1985.
· Bruner J.S., Towards a theory of instruction, New York, Harvard University Press, 1966.
· Byrne D. , Teaching oral English, Hong Kong, Longman, 1988.
· Capra U., Vademecum multimedia, Torino, Sergio Monelli Editore, 2000.
· Carter R. and Long M. N., Teaching Literature, Harlow, Longman, 1991.
· Collie J. and Slater S., Literature in the Language Classroom, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1987.
· La Rana S., La didattica dell’inglese, Napoli, Liguori, 2001.
· Manley A., Literature Teaching, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1990.
· Nacci F., La sostanza curricolare, Napoli, Morano Editore, 1990.
· Porcelli G. – Dolci R., Multimedialità e insegnamenti linguistici, Milano, Utet , 2000.
· Rhys Jean, Wide Sargasso Sea, London, Penguin, 2003.
· Short M. H., Reading, Analysing and Teaching Literature, Longman, Harlow, 1986.
· Thomson G. and Maglioni S., Literary Links vol.3, Genova, Cideb, 2004.



[1] Guarded: kept under control.

[2] Fender: a low frame to keep in falling coals.

[3] Grovelled: crawled.

[4] Snatched: grabbed suddently.

[5] Growled: made an aggressive animal-like noise.

[6] Grizzled: grey.

[7] Mane: the hair of the neck of a horse.

[8] Good morrow: good morning.

[9] Charge: person entrusted to someone’s care.

[10] Mess: (here) the misture, the liquid.

[11] Hob: cooker, strofe.

[12] Snappish: sharp, aggressive.

[13] ‘rageous: outrageous, i.e. furious.

[14] Hind feet: rear legs.

[15] Trotted: strangled.

[16] Endarmements: loving or affectionate words.

[17] Gambols: playful movements.

[18] Ragout: (here) rage, attack of of anger.

[19] Wood: the priest.

[20] Briggs: the solicitor who pointed out that Mr Rochester was already married.

[21] Yonder: over there

[22] Bulk: (here) big body.

[23] Ye: you.  

[24] She: Grace Pool.

[25] He: Rochester.

[26] Smashed: broke.

[27] Portole: circular window on a ship.